Billboard reviews “When We Were Young”

August 18, 2007  |  Comments Off on Billboard reviews “When We Were Young”  |  by Zombieguide Archives  |  Dolores O'Riordan

Music industry magazine Billboard has given a favorable review to “When We Were Young,” the new second single from Dolores O’Riordan’s Are You Listening? Here’s what they had to say:

When We Were Young
DOLORES O’RIORDAN
Producer(s): Dolores O’Riordan, Richard Chycki Genre: POP
Label: Sanctuary

The first solo single from Cranberries vocalist Dolores O’Riordan, “Ordinary Day,” was an elegant bow for her album “Are You Listening,” reminiscent of pop classic “Linger.” Enough of that, eh? Follow-up “When We Were Young” is a closer reminder of her “Zombie” signature, with vocal octave-jumping and a haughty gambol between electric guitars and percussion. Radio hesitated to react the first time around, but with the brassy approach of “Young,” O’Riordan has potential to charm adults who know her on a first-name basis. Active rock, as seldom as it indulges the ladies, would also do well to usher this talent back to active duty.”Chuck Taylor

Avril Lavigne chooses Cranberries, Marilyn Manson

August 17, 2007  |  Comments Off on Avril Lavigne chooses Cranberries, Marilyn Manson  |  by Zombieguide Archives  |  The Cranberries

Target is releasing a compilation album with 10 songs chosen by Avril Lavigne as part of their series, “Influences”. One of the songs listed is “Dreams” by The Cranberries. This may catch a few Cranberries fans oguard.

Another complete shocker is her decision to include “This Is The New Shit” by Marilyn Manson – seeing that this is a target release it will most probably be the censored version.

There are also the not-so surprising appearances by punk bands Blink-182 and The Distillers on the compilation.

Spin mentions Cranberries in cover article

August 5, 2007  |  Comments Off on Spin mentions Cranberries in cover article  |  by Zombieguide Archives  |  The Cranberries

US rock magazine Spin mentioned The Cranberries in the first paragraph of the August 2007 cover article on Interpol. The magazine mentioned that “Linger” played at a Dallas Hooters restaurant — where the interview took place — and later went on to contrast the two bands.

David Peisner wrote in the article,

The Hooters in downtown Dallas is not just any Hooters. It is, [guistarist Daniel] Kessler informs me, the largest Hooters in the world. In his black suit, black sweater-vest, and dark sunglesses, the chatty New York vegetarian strieks an odd figure in a chain restaurant known primarily for large-breasted, skimpily outfitted waitresses and chicken wings. Neon beer signs cover the walls, a rerun of the Coca-Cola 600 from Lowe’s Motor Speedway beams from the TV overhead, and the sound system blares inoensive radio-rock staples, including Blind Melon’s “No Rain,” the Cranberries’ “Linger,” and Dave Matthews Band’s “The Space Between.”

Peisner later goes on to write that Interpol are not (yet) at that same level of universal appeal as the aforementioned songs, but would like to be.

The middle of the country is where Interpol need to make their presence felt if they’re going to graduate from their post as New York City’s well-dressed, brooding indie-rock mascots and become, well, a band whose songs might be played over the sound system at the largest Hooters in the world.

The Cranberries Press